Advertisement

The Role of Lectin in Association Between Rice and Nitrogen-Fixing Bacteria

  • S. Chaopongpang
  • S. Pornpattkul
  • C. Pitaksutheepong
  • J. Limpananont
  • P. Chaisiri
  • J. Boonjawat

Abstract

Lectins are multivalent carbohydrate-binding proteins and glycoproteins. In rice and other cereal crops, lectins are well characterized for their binding specificity to N-acetylglucosamine or its oligomers. Although the natural function of lectin remains unknown, several possible functions of cereal lectins have been proposed including an involvement in plantmicrobial interaction. We found that rice lectins are not exclusively confined to embryo, but also in seedling leaf and root, especially at the root tip, and opening stoma of young leaf, which are preferent adhesion sites of microbes. Lectin contents varied with developmental stage and environmental factors. Different rice varieties contain different amount of lectin and respond differently to inoculation by associative nitrogen-fixing Klebsiella R15 and R17. Better plant growth promotion and associative nitrogen-fixation were observed in high lectin variety. Colonization of bacteria on the root surface increased the root lectin. Our results support for the potential application of nitrogen-fixing Klebsiella for promotion of growth and associative nitrogen fixation in rice, Oryza sativa L.

Keywords

Rice Cultivar Rice Seedling Bacterial Inoculation Acetylene Reduction Activity Colonization Potential 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bohlool, B.B. and Schmidt, E.L. 1974. Science 185,269–271.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Boonjawat, J., Limpananont, J., Horisberger, M. 1988. Nitrogen Fixation: Hundred Years After. Proceedings of the 7th International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation, p. 792. Eds. H. Bothe, F.J. de Bruijn, and W.E. Newton. Gustav. Fischer. Stuttgard: New York Publishers.Google Scholar
  3. Bradford, M.M. 1976. Anal. Biochem. 72,248–254.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Christensen, T.M.I.V., Diaz, C.L and Kijne, W.J. 1986. Lectins.Google Scholar
  5. Dazzo, F.B. and Hubbel, D.H. 1975. Appl. Microbiol. 30,1017–1033.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Diaz, C.L., Melcher, L.S., Hooykass, P.J.J., Lugtenberg, B.J.J. and Kijne, J.W. 1989. Nature 338, 579–581.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Dobereiner, J. 1977. Advances in Agronomy 29,11.Google Scholar
  8. Dobereiner, J. and Pedrosa, F.O. 1987. Nitrogen-fixing Bacteria in Non-leguminous Crop Plants, p. 168, Springer, Berlin.Google Scholar
  9. Fallik, E., Okon, Y., Epstein, E., Goldman, A. and Fischer, M. 1988. Soil Biol. Biochem. 21,147–153.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Fuhrmann, J. and Wollum II A.G. 1985. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 49,1010–1013.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. Luria, S.E., Adams, J.N. and Teng, R,C. 1960. Virology 12,348–390.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Okon, Y., Sarig, S. and Blum, A. 1989. Recent Advances in Microbial Ecology, Proceedings of the 5th International Symposium on Microbial Ecology, p.196–200. Eds. T. Hattori, Y Ishida, Y. Maruyama, R.Y. Morita, A. Uchida, Japan Scientific Societies Press.Google Scholar
  13. Purushothaman, D., Oblisami, G. and Balasun, C.S. 1976. Madras Agric. J. 63,595–599.Google Scholar
  14. Raikhel, N.V. and Pratt, LH. 1987. Plant Cell Reports 6,141–149.Google Scholar
  15. Truchet, G.L., Sherwood, J.E., Pankratz, H.S. and Dazzo, F.B. 1986. Physiol. Plant 66,575–582.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Weaver, P.K., Wall, J.D. and Gest, H. 1975. Arch. Microbiol. 105,207–216.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Chaopongpang
    • 1
  • S. Pornpattkul
    • 1
  • C. Pitaksutheepong
    • 1
  • J. Limpananont
    • 1
    • 2
  • P. Chaisiri
    • 1
  • J. Boonjawat
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of ScienceChulalongkorn UniversityBangkokThailand
  2. 2.Faculty of Pharmaceutical ScienceChulalongkorn UniversityBangkokThailand

Personalised recommendations