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Groundwater Markets in Pakistan: Institutional Development and Productivity Impacts

  • Ruth S. Meinzen-Dick
Part of the Natural Resource Management and Policy book series (NRMP, volume 15)

Abstracts

There is considerable interest throughout much of South Asia in water markets as a means of increasing access to and use of groundwater for irrigation (xcKahnert and Levine, 1993); (xcMoench, 1994). This interest arises not only from a recognition of the importance of groundwater resources for agricultural production, but also as an example of a spontaneously-developed institution for water management. In contrast to formalized water markets in countries such as Chile, groundwater markets in South Asia do not represent government-sanctioned or regulated sales of tradable water rights, but rather informal “spot markets” for the sale of water from private wells.

Keywords

Canal Irrigation Canal Water Water Market Groundwater Irrigation Irrigation Surplus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ruth S. Meinzen-Dick
    • 1
  1. 1.International Food Policy Research Institute

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