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Soil Formation pp 135-150 | Cite as

Organic Surface Horizons

Abstract

Organic matter reaches the soil as litter at the soil surface and as decaying roots, root exudates, and microbial biomass (dead microbes, hyphae of fungi) in the soil. Breakdown of litter to CO2 and humic substances, and mixing of the organic material with mineral soil are affected by soil biota (Chapter 4). Between 1 and 5% of the organic matter in the soil consists of living micro-organisms.

Keywords

Organic Matter Soil Organic Matter Organic Matter Content Pool Size Litter Layer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

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