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Soil Formation pp 271-289 | Cite as

Formation of Andisols

Abstract

Andisols are soils that are dominated by amorphous aluminium silicates and/or Alorganic matter complexes. They usually have a Ah - Bw - C horizon sequence. The Ah horizon is dark-coloured and normally very high in organic matter (often more than 10%) stabilized by aluminium. The B horizon is usually dominated by amorphous aluminium silicates (allophane, impogolite). Andisols form mainly on volcanic ashes, but can also be found on other highly weatherable rock such as amfibolites, arkoses, etc. We will use the term ‘andisol’ loosely, to indicate soils formed by processes that are typical of the andisols of the USDA soil classification and the Andosols of the FAO classification. Because the organic and non-organic secondary products in Andosols are of such overwhelming importance for the properties of these soils, most attention in this chapter is paid to the characteristics of these weathering products.

Keywords

Phosphate Adsorption Water Binding Capacity Amorphous Silicate High Water Retention Allophanic Soil 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

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