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Soil Formation pp 245-270 | Cite as

Podzolization

Abstract

From top to bottom, a podzol profile consists of:
  • - a litter layer (O)

  • - a humose mineral topsoil (Ah), which may be absent,

  • - a bleached, eluvial layer (E)

  • - an accumulation layer of organic matter in combination with iron and aluminium (Bh, Bhs, Bs).

Keywords

Organic Matter Fulvic Acid Dissolve Organic Matter Litter Layer Illuvial Horizon 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

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