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Strategies for the Use of Geography in Epidemiological Analysis

  • Andrew Westlake
Part of the The GeoJournal Library book series (GEJL, volume 24)

Abstract

The health of populations is affected by a variety of lifestyle and environmental factors, including where people live. Characteristics of locations (including sociodemographic factors and environmental exposure) offer additional information for studies about health. Spatial methods and other geographical procedures can be useful tools in epidemiological investigations, but must serve the analysis and not drive it. Even where accurate environmental data of appropriate resolution are available, our approach should not be “how can we make use of this data?”, but rather “what health problems are we trying to solve, and what are the appropriate data and methods to help us find solutions?”. This chapter addresses some of the issues in using geography, relating these to the various stages of an investigation.

Keywords

Geographical Information System Epidemiological Investigation Lung Cancer Rate Small Area Statistical Census Small Area 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Barker, D.J.P. & C. Osmond (1987). Death rates from stroke in England and Wales predicted from past maternal mortality. Br Med J, 295: 83–86.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Brown, P.J.B., W.J. Batey & A. Hirschfield (1991). Prerequisites for the Poisson chi square mapping and geodemographic analysis of relatively rare conditions. In: Proceedings of a Workshop on Geographical Data Structures for Small Area Statistical Analysis. London, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.Google Scholar
  3. Clayton, D. & J. Kaldor (1987). Empirical Bayes estimates of age-standardised relative risks for use in disease mapping. Biometrics, 43: 671.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew Westlake
    • 1
  1. 1.London School of Hygiene and Tropical MedicineUniversity of LondonLondonUK

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