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An Introduction to Geographical Information Systems

  • Henk J. Scholten
  • Marion J. C. de Lepper
Part of the The GeoJournal Library book series (GEJL, volume 24)

Abstract

This chapter introduces geographical information systems (GIS) by describing some fundamental concepts important to them in more detail. It aims to help the newcomer to GIS and to provide some understanding of what GIS are and what they can be used for. The concept of GIS will be described in a number of ways: formal definition, examination of distinguishing features in regard to other information systems, the type of questions it can help answer, its ability to carry out certain specific operations and, listing the components a GIS comprises. In addition, the subject matters of this chapter are both the latest developments in the fields of hardware and software in a GIS environment and future directions and trends in these fields. As the concept of GIS not only includes hardware and software, this chapter will, in addition, briefly consider types of data and data storage and the different types of user groups and their differentiated GIS needs.

Keywords

Geographical Information System Geographical Information System Geographical Information System Software Geographical Information System Environment Data Base Management System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Henk J. Scholten
    • 1
  • Marion J. C. de Lepper
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Regional EconomicsFree University AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.National Institute of Public Health and Environmental ProtectionBilthovenThe Netherlands

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