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Building a Geographical Information System in the European Community: The Corine Experience

  • David J. Briggs
Part of the The GeoJournal Library book series (GEJL, volume 24)

Abstract

The CORINE Programme of the European Community represents one of the most ambitious and extensive attempts to establish a geographical information system for policy applications that has yet been undertaken in Europe. As such, it has much useful experience to offer the various new international systems that are now being developed or are planned. This chapter outlines the experience of establishing the CORINE information system and shows some of the conceptual, technical and administrative problems involved.

Keywords

Geographical Information System Soil Erosion European Community Geographical Information System Digital Terrain Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • David J. Briggs
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Environmental and Policy AnalysisUniversity of HuddersfieldQueensgateUK

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