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What is Special about Endogenous International Trade Policy in Transition Economies?

  • Arye L. Hillman
  • Heinrich Ursprung

Abstract

All countries conduct international trade, their governments choose international trade policies, and general theories explain the sources of comparative advantage that underlie the gains from freer international trade, while theories of endogenous policy explain trade-policy decisions. The theories encompass in their generality those countries that have a socialist past and have only in the 1990s embarked on the path to private-property market economies. Are there, however, required modifications, or special aspects of the general theories that merit stressing in application to the transition economies?

Keywords

Foreign Investor Trade Policy Political Support Reaction Function Foreign Capital 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arye L. Hillman
    • 1
  • Heinrich Ursprung
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of EconomiesBor: Ilan UniversityIsrael
  2. 2.Department of EconomiesUniversity of KonstanzGermany

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