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Chemicals in Plants

Part of the Contemporary Topics in Entomology book series (COTE, volume 2)

Abstract

The acceptance or rejection of plants by phytophagous insects depends on their behavioral responses to plant features. These features may be physical or chemical. Morphological characters of plants can influence acceptability, either directly by providing suitable visual cues, or by influencing the ability of insects to walk on or bite into tissue. Furthermore, most species of phytophagous insects are confined to certain plant parts, and this will determine the physical and chemical attributes to which the insects respond. The more detailed anatomy and its associated chemistry may constrain or otherwise influence feeding of small insects in particular.

Keywords

Secondary Metabolite Phenolic Acid Condensed Tannin Ursolic Acid Glandular Trichome 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further reading

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Copyright information

© Chapman & Hall, New York, NY 1994

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