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Energy Needs in the Next Century

  • John Ward

Abstract

In strict scientific terms the title of this lecture is misleading since energy cannot be destroyed, it can only be changed from one form to another, i.e. it is always conserved. However, in the present context I will take energy conservation to mean the use of less energy to provide virtually all the services and goods demanded by modern industrialised societies. People increasingly require energy-related services, such as warm and well-lit homes and work-places, transport, refrigeration and air conditioning, telecommunications and manufactured products, so that world energy consumption is steadily growing and currently stands at the equivalent of using approximately 9 billion tonnes of oil per annum (Figure 1). Nearly 90 per cent of this energy is obtained by burning fossil fuels, such as oil, natural gas, or coal and this is leading to increasing environmental concern.

Keywords

Energy Efficiency Energy Conservation Modern Industrialise Society Energy Saving Technology Energy Conservation Measure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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10. Further Reading

  1. House of Commons Select Committee on Energy, ‘Energy Efficiency’, Third Report, H.M.S.O., 1991.Google Scholar
  2. “Energy Technologies for Reducing Emission of Greenhouse Gases”, Proceedings of Experts Seminar, O.E.C.D/I.E.A., Paris, 1989Google Scholar
  3. J B.W. Dale “Abatement of Greenhouse Gases in the United Kingdom” in “Energy Technologies for Reducing Emission of Greenhouse Gases” Proceedings of Experts Seminar, E.E.C.D./I.E.A, Paris, 1989.Google Scholar
  4. Watt Committee on Energy, “Technological Responses to the Greenhouse Effect” Report No 23, Elsevier Applied Science Publishers, London, 1990Google Scholar
  5. J. Blunden and A. Reddish, “Energy, Resources and Environment” The Open University and Hodder and Stoughton, 1991Google Scholar
  6. P.M. Smith and K. Warr, “Global Environmental Issues” The Open University and Hodder and Stoughton, 1991Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Ward
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering of University of GlamorganPontypridd Mid GlamorganUK

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