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Unix for Nomads: Making Unix Support Mobile Computing

  • Michael Bender
  • Alexander Davidson
  • Clark Dong
  • Steven Drach
  • Anthony Glenning
  • Karl Jacob
  • Jack Jia
  • James Kempf
  • Nachiappan Periakaruppan
  • Gale Snow
  • Becky Wong
Part of the The Kluwer International Series in Engineering and Computer Science book series (SECS, volume 353)

Abstract

Traditionally, the Unix operating system1 has been associated with deskbound machines tethered to the wall by a power cord and an Ethernet cable. Making Unix support a more nomadic model of computing requires changes in the entire system, from the kernel level through the user command set of applications. In this paper, we present the results of an experimental prototype development effort targeted at supporting a nomadic computing model in Sun’s Solaris 2 SVR4-based platform2. The development involved enhancements in four primary areas: kernel changes to support power management and checkpointing of system state, drivers and other kernel support for the new PCMCIA bus standard, support for serial line networking, and a new electronic mail application designed specifically for accessing mail over slow serial connections. The paper discusses enhancements and modifications to the design of standard Solaris system components in each of these areas.

Keywords

Power Management Electronic Mail Device Driver Serial Line Link Manager 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© USENIX Association 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Bender
    • 1
  • Alexander Davidson
    • 1
  • Clark Dong
    • 1
  • Steven Drach
    • 1
  • Anthony Glenning
    • 1
  • Karl Jacob
    • 1
  • Jack Jia
    • 1
  • James Kempf
    • 1
  • Nachiappan Periakaruppan
    • 1
  • Gale Snow
    • 1
  • Becky Wong
    • 1
  1. 1.Sun Microsystems, Inc.Mountain View

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