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Extreme II: Radical Civil Rights

Reform without Context
Part of the Clinical Sociology: Research and Practice book series (CSRP)

Abstract

Shortly before his death, Mike Royko got into trouble. In one of his last columns for The Chicago Tribune, he made an egregious error. After having mentioned the unusual first name of an African-American athlete, he went on to ask, “What is this thing with black names anyway?” For raising this question, he was almost immediately pilloried by a media-wide posse. Crusading and outspoken critic though he had always been,1 within two days he was forced to issue a retraction wherein he begged forgiveness for his indiscretion. To suggest that there was something peculiar about black names clearly had to be due to an unconscious bias. It implied that there was something wrong with them and this was an impression he wished to rectify.

Keywords

Affirmative Action Black Male Black Community Black Family Intimate Friendship 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes and References

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© Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers 1999

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