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Extreme I: Radical Feminism

The Last Bastion of Marxism
Part of the Clinical Sociology: Research and Practice book series (CSRP)

Abstract

Several years ago, a female friend, a college professor, came to visit me at my home. I was living by myself fairly comfortably in a large contemporary house replete with multiple bathrooms. After chatting for awhile, she excused herself so that she could use one of these. When she returned, she indicated that she had something important to tell me. As a slight blush traversed her face, she hesitantly asked if I realized that the toilet seat in my guest lavatory had been in the raised position. Wasn’t I aware that female visitors might, from time to time, want to use the facility and that it was only polite to keep the seat down in deference to them? She was positive that I did not want to acquire a reputation for being a male chauvinist pig.

Keywords

Sexual Harassment Affirmative Action Radical Feminist False Consciousness Middle Class Woman 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes and References

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© Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers 1999

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