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Coronary artery bypass for advanced left ventricular dysfunction

  • John A. Elefteriades
  • George Tellides
  • Habib Samady
  • Meher Yepremyan
  • Umer Darr
  • Franz J. Th. Wackers
  • Barry Zaret
Part of the Developments in Cardiovascular Medicine book series (DICM, volume 225)

Abstract

Although courageous forays into the application of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) to the patient with advanced left ventricular dysfunction were made since the early davs of open heart surgery, the opinion that the patient with advanced left ventricular dysfunction could not and should not be offered coronary artery bypass surgery prevailed well into the 1980’s. The reluctance centered around three concerns: (1) that the risk of operation would be prohibitive, (2) that little symptomatic or longevity benefit would accrue from CABG, and (3) that CABG would merely punctuate an inevitable course of inexorable deterioration. Cardiologists were therefore reluctant to refer such patients for coronary revascularization and surgeons were reluctant to accept such patients. In terms of scientific evaluation, most large multicenter trials of coronary artery bypass grafting purposely excluded patients with advanced left ventricular dysfunction. (Ejection fraction was >35/a in the Coronary Artery Surgery Study (CASS) and >50% for the European Coronary Surgery Study (ECSS)).1,2

Keywords

Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Coronary Artery Bypass Ischemic Cardiomyopathy Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Patient Coronary Artery Surgery Study 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • John A. Elefteriades
  • George Tellides
  • Habib Samady
  • Meher Yepremyan
  • Umer Darr
  • Franz J. Th. Wackers
  • Barry Zaret

There are no affiliations available

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