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Oxford and the Emergence of Political Science in England 1945–1960

  • Malcolm Vout
Part of the Sociology of the Sciences Yearbook book series (SOSC, volume 15)

Abstract

During the 1950’s a change of direction within the study of politics was taking place. A new orthodoxy in political studies was evolving and new directions were being indicated which concerned a shift in focus towards the social sciences rather than history or philosophy. In sum, expectations and assumptions were changing in the academic community of politics lecturers and of course within the wider spheres of culture and political practice.

Keywords

Political Science Political Philosophy Political Theory Political Study Political Inquiry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes and References

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Malcolm Vout

There are no affiliations available

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