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Quality in peritoneal dialysis: achieving improving outcomes

  • Barbara F. Prowant
  • Karl D. Nolph
  • Leonor Ponferrada
  • Ramesh Khanna
  • Zbylut J. Twardowski
Part of the Developments in Nephrology book series (DINE, volume 39)

Abstract

The goal of this chapter is to discuss the characteristics of systems (structure) and activities (process) within a peritoneal dialysis (PD) program which contribute to optimal outcomes (quality) for peritoneal dialysis patients.

Keywords

Peritoneal Dialysis Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Peritoneal Dialysis Patient Exit Site Chronic Peritoneal Dialysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara F. Prowant
  • Karl D. Nolph
  • Leonor Ponferrada
  • Ramesh Khanna
  • Zbylut J. Twardowski

There are no affiliations available

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