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Renal Failure

  • Gerald M. Woerlee
Part of the Developments in Critical Care Medicine and Anesthesiolgy book series (DCCA, volume 26)

Abstract

The kidneys play an important role in the elimination of many drugs used in anesthesia. They eliminate both unchanged drugs and their metabolites. Renal failure reduces the elimination of drugs and drug metabolites which are eliminated in the urine. In addition to this, renal failure also causes changes in body physiology which can also affect the pharmacology of anesthetic drugs.

Keywords

Renal Failure Chronic Renal Failure Unchanged Drug Anesthetic Drug Postgraduate Medical Journal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerald M. Woerlee
    • 1
  1. 1.Rijnoord HospitalAlphen aan den RijnThe Netherlands

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