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Introduction to Neuromorphic Communication

  • Tor Sverre Lande
Part of the The Springer International Series in Engineering and Computer Science book series (SECS, volume 447)

Abstract

The somewhat artificial term “Neuromorphic Communication” indicates the aim of transmitting information similar to our neural system. The “spiky” information coding found in our nerve-fibers seems to be quite inadequate for microelectronics. With a limited dynamic range of two to three orders of magnitude and poor noise margins, this kind of information coding may look like a bad choice from an engineering perspective.

Keywords

Analog State Information Code Stereoscopic Vision Limited Dynamic Range Pulse Frequency Modulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tor Sverre Lande
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of InformaticsUniversity of OsloOsloNorway

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