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The Physician and Authority: A Historical Appraisal

  • Russell C. Maulitz
Part of the Philosophy and Medicine book series (PHME, volume 29)

Abstract

As far as medicine and health care are concerned, most of us probably share the feeling that the ground is shifting under our feet. Things are changing. The litany is everywhere: for-profit hospitals, the senescence of the biomedical model, Diagnosis Related Groups, the malpractice crisis, and so on. How did we get to this pass?

Keywords

Medical Profession England Journal Diagnosis Related Group Legal Authority Pecking Order 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Russell C. Maulitz
    • 1
  1. 1.Presbyterian-University of Pennsylvania Medical CenterPhiladelphia

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