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Behavioral Approaches to Illness Prevention for Native Americans

  • Steven Schinke
Part of the The Plenum Series in Culture and Health book series (PSCH)

Abstract

Much evidence suggests that the health of Native Americans is worse than the health of America’s general population. In fact, Native American people suffer inordinately from cancers linked to both behavioral and lifestyle patterns (Beauvais, Oetting, Wolf, & Edwards, 1989; “Cancer hits all time high, 1991;” Mao, Morrison, Semenciw, & Wigle, 1986; National Cancer Institute, 1986). Cancer is the third leading cause of death among Native Americans (Rhoades, Hammond, Welty, Hander, & Amler, 1987). Whereas cancer was a relatively rare problem for Native Americans in the earlier part of this century, deaths from cancer among Alaska Natives and Indians in the northern United States now exceed average U.S. rates (Lanier, 1993). In addition, the 5-year survival rate for Native American people with cancer is the lowest of any ethnic group in the United States (Stillman, 1992).

Keywords

Government Printing Smokeless Tobacco Native AMERICANS Native American Population Illness Prevention 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven Schinke
    • 1
  1. 1.Columbia University School of Social WorkNew York

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