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Recent Trends and Open Issues in Reverse Engineering

  • Linda M. Wills
  • James H. CrossII

Abstract

This paper discusses recent trends in the field of reverse engineering, particularly those highlighted at the Second Working Conference on Reverse Engineering, held in July 1995. The trends observed include increased orientation toward tasks, grounding in complex real-world applications, guidance from empirical study, analysis of non-code sources, and increased formalization. The paper also summarizes open research issues and provides pointers to future events and sources of information in this area.

Keywords

IEEE Computer Society Reverse Engineering Business Rule Reverse Engineer Open Research Issue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda M. Wills
    • 1
  • James H. CrossII
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Electrical and Computer EngineeringGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlanta
  2. 2.Auburn University, Computer Science and Engineering

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