Advertisement

Tackling the Drug Problem

Governments as Strategic Planners

Abstract

Major problems, which affect countries as well as groups and individuals, are likely to be addressed by a hierarchy of problem solvers. At the top of this hierarchy will be governments and government-sponsored bodies. This chapter will discuss how the drug problem is being tackled at this level. Governments have the ultimate responsibility for drug prevention strategy, and they must have a clear understanding of the problem and of how it is affecting their citizens. This requires “rational reconstruction,” the ability to state with confidence “this happened because …” It also requires “legitimation.” Solutions and the strategies used to achieve these must be accepted and approved by a majority.1 Solutions will only be implemented if they are socially, psychologically, and culturally acceptable.

Keywords

European Union Organize Crime Police Force Illegal Drug Drug Trafficking 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

  1. 1.
    Andrew Tudor, Problem Solving (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1982).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    “USA Round-Up,” Intersec 5,no. 1, 3, 4, 5, 9,10 (January, March, April, June, September, October, 1995).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    “USA Round-Up,” Intersec 7,no. 6 (June 1997).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
  5. 5.
    Lee Smith, “The FBI Is a Touch Outfit to Run,” Fortune 9,no. 21 (1989): 81–83.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Fenton Bresler, Interpol (London: Sinclair-Stevenson, 1992).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    European Parliament News (February 1998).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
  9. 9.
    Michael Forde, “International/EU Criminal Law,” in Justice Cooperation in the European Union, ed. Gavin Barrett (Dublin: Institute of European Affairs, 1997).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Val Flynn, “Europol—a Watershed in Law Enforcement Cooperation,” in Justice Cooperation in the European Union, ed. Gavin Barrett (Dublin: Institute of European Affairs, 1997).Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Times (March 23, 1998).Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Forde, “International/EU Criminal Law.”Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Val Flynn, “The Treaty of Amsterdam,” Intersec 8,no. 1 (January 1998): 18–20.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Flynn, “Europol.”Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Dermot Gilroy, “Customs Cooperation in the Third Pillar,” in Justice Cooperation in the European Union, ed. Gavin Barrett (Dublin: Institute of European Affairs, 1997).Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Jason Lloyd, Drugs, Addiction and the Law (London: Elm Publications, 1995).Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    British White Paper, “Tackling Drugs Together: A Strategy for England 1995–98” (London: HMSO, 1995).Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Ian Greig, “The Growing Menace of Intimidation,” Intersec 4,no. 5 (May 1992).Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    “National Criminal Intelligence Service,” Intersec 4,no. 9 (September 1994): 301–302.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Sunday Observer (May 18, 1997).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers 1999

Personalised recommendations