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Development of the U.S. Federal Role in Children’s Health Care: A Critical Appraisal

  • Ann L. Wilson
Part of the Philosophy and Medicine book series (PHME, volume 33)

Abstract

In this paper I will examine the history of one way in which the federal government of the United States attempts “to promote the general Welfare” and “secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity”, namely, through the provision of health care for children. My account will begin at the turn of the century when the idea of a Children’s Bureau to gather data on the status of the nation’s children was; first conceived. I will argue that, since that time, three themes are dominant in Congressional and public debate about federal responsibility for children’s health care. They are: what is the authority of government to create legislation and policy affecting children’s health; what are the economics of supporting health care for children; and whether health care for children should be a basic human right compelling its provision as a humane act of government. These are issues elected officials have faced and attempted to resolve as they have debated, voted on, and funded legislation for children’s health care.1

Keywords

Child Labor Birth Registration Block Grant Title Versus Federal Authority 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ann L. Wilson
    • 1
  1. 1.School of MedicineUniversity of South DakotaSioux Falls

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