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Healthy Carolinians Microfinancing: Igniting the Power of the Community

  • Mary Bobbitt-Cooke
Chapter

Abstract

Imagine having an innovative funding mechanism to distribute limited health promotion/disease prevention funds within communities that will foster successful health improvement programs at the local level. Imagine that this alternative funding mechanism is cost effective and has been shown to bring the community together to work on improving the health of its residents. Imagine this alternate funding mechanism tapping into community resources by engaging community-based organizations in health improvement activities and mobilizing skilled community members. The Healthy Carolinians Microfinancing Project demonstrated that an innovative, alternative funding mechanism could realize all these visions and more.

Keywords

Public Health Service Health Objective Local Health Department Soccer Game Funding Community Health 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The author thanks the 32 Healthy Carolinians Coalitions and the 199 community-based organizations that participated in the North Carolina Healthy Carolinians Microgrant Project for their work and belief in the project. The author also acknowledges the Governor’s Task Force for Healthy Carolinians and the Division of Public Health, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, for their support of the project.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.

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