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Practical and Pragmatic: Strategically Applying Gender Perspectives to Increase the Power of Global Health Policies and Programs

  • Geeta Rao Gupta
  • Sarah Degnan Kambou
Chapter

Abstract

Dr. Sarah Degnan Kambou presently serves as Chief Operating Officer and Vice President of the Health and Development Group at ICRW She is an expert on gender and development issues, particularly those pertaining to sexual and reproductive health. Dr. Degnan Kambou is widely recognized for her innovative work integrating gender into development policies and programming, with organizations as diverse as CARE, Oxfam America, and UN agencies. Dr. Degnan Kambou leads a team of researchers at ICRW who specialize in gender, health, nutrition, and development, and approach development issues from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Prior to joining ICRW, Dr. Degnan Kambou worked for CARE in West and Southern Africa for more than a decade. She served for 8 years at Boston University’s School of Public Health (BUSPH), and was co-founder of the Center for International Health at BUSPH. Dr. Degnan Kambou has a Ph.D. in international health policy, an M.P.H. in health services delivery from Boston University, and a B.A. magna cum laude in French language and literature from the University of Connecticut.

Keywords

Reproductive Health United Nations Gender Equality Promote Gender Equality International Food Policy Research Institute 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.

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