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The Impact of HIV Policies and Politics on Communities of Color

  • M. Keith Rawlings
  • Deborah Parham Hopson
Chapter

Abstract

Medicaid, Medicare, and the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program are the three primary public payers of HIV/AIDS care in the USA today (see Fig. 1). Though far from flawless, they create access to services for scores of underserved minority people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). These programs are key to scaling back the ominous and disproportionate presence of HIV/AIDS among underserved people of color.

In 2005,* this presence was visible in the demographics of PLWHA (see Fig. 2):
  • Approximately half of the people who developed HIV/AIDS were blacks† and one-fifth were Hispanics.1

  • African American men were nearly eight times more likely to have AIDS than non-Hispanic white men, and Hispanic men were nearly three times more likely to have AIDS than non-Hispanic white men.2

  • African American women were nearly 23 times more likely to have AIDS than non-Hispanic white women, and Hispanic women were five times more likely to have AIDS than non-Hispanic white women.3

  • American Indian and Alaska Natives were more than twice likely to have AIDS than non-Hispanic whites.2

Keywords

Medicare Beneficiary Federal Poverty Level Supplemental Security Income Drug Coverage Needle Exchange Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Peabody Health CenterAIDS Arms, Inc.DallasU.S.

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