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“Doing Mathematics” from the Learners’ Perspectives

  • John M. Francisco
Chapter

Abstract

The previous chapters focused on aspects of the cognitive development of the students in the longitudinal study. The present chapter looks into the epistemological growth of the students. During the longitudinal study, individual clinical interviews were conducted with the students with the goal of capturing the mathematical beliefs that the students might have developed in connection with their experiences in the longitudinal study.

Keywords

Epistemological Belief Math Teacher Discovery Learning Mathematical Belief Epistemological View 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Secondary Mathematics Education, Department of Teacher Education & Curriculum StudiesUniversity of Massachusetts AmherstAmherstUSA

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