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Vulva

  • Donna M. Coffey
  • Ibrahim Ramzy
Chapter
Part of the Frozen Section Library book series (FROZEN, volume 11)

Abstract

Benign and malignant neoplasms as well as reactive inflammatory lesions of the vulva present as ulcers, white plaques, swellings, and red or dark pigmented lesions. In view of the overlap in clinical and gross features, surgical sampling is often required to establish the diagnosis. Almost all intraoperative consultations relate to the evaluation of malignant or premalignant lesions (Table 2.1). Specimens generally fall into two categories: (a) biopsies and other limited procedures for diagnostic/therapeutic indications and (b) a variety of vulvar resections of pre-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions.

Keywords

Human Papilloma Virus Basal Cell Carcinoma Human Papilloma Virus Infection Vulvar Cancer Lichen Sclerosus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Pathology and Genomic Medicine The Methodist HospitalWeill Medical College of Cornell UniversityHoustonUSA
  2. 2.University of CaliforniaIrvineUSA

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