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Immigration Policies Outside of the United States

  • Steven G. Koven
  • Frank Götzke
Chapter
Part of the Public Administration, Governance and Globalization book series (PAGG, volume 1)

Abstract

Migration is a rapidly emerging field of study for disciplines such as political science, public policy, public administration, international relations (Hollifield 2008, 183). A few political studies of immigration were conducted in the 1970s (Castles and Kosack 1973; Freeman 1979), however, migration studies remained on the margins of political science until the 1990s. Recently studies have focused upon questions such as how to control immigration (Brochman and Hammar 1999; Cornelius et al. 2004), how immigration impacts international relations (Rudolph 2006), and the effect of immigration on citizenship, national identity and rights (Freeman 2004). Some migration studies have been comparative in nature

Keywords

National Identity Asylum Seeker Immigration Policy National Front Ethnic German 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Urban Studies Institute, University of LouisvilleLouisvilleUSA

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