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Fatigue Damage Map as a Virtual Tool for Fatigue Damage Tolerance

  • Chris A. Rodopoulos
Chapter

Abstract

Using only readily available material properties and the concept of dislocation density evolution ahead of the crack tip, the fatigue damage map attends to develop a virtual tool able to predict the limits and the corresponding crack tip propagation rates characterising each of the fatigue stages, namely crack arrest, microstructurally and physically short crack (Stage I), long crack growth (Stage II), and Stage III growth.

Keywords

Crack Length Plastic Zone Crack Growth Rate Fatigue Damage Stress Intensity Factor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Laboratory of Technology and Strength of Materials, Department of Mechanical Engineering and AeronauticsUniversity of PatrasGreece

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