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Sustainable Development and Energy Policies

  • İbrahim Dinçer
  • Calin Zamfirescu
Chapter

Abstract

We live in a period characterized by accentuated transition efforts from a fossil fuel–based economy toward a projected economy based on sustainable energy. The development of a global society passed through the fossil fuel era when most primary energy had been obtained by combustion of coal, petroleum, and natural gas. In the present period, there is larger panoply of primary energy sources that include nuclear power and hydroelectricity; in addition, other forms of renewable energy have gained terrain such as wind, solar, biomass combustion, and biofuels for transportation. Therefore, the development of a hydrogen-fuel infrastructure for transportation is projected. Most likely in the future the combustion of fossil fuels will be performed cleanly so that zero emission power generation will be achieved at an attractive cost.

Keywords

Environmental Impact Assessment Green Energy Sustainability Assessment Utilization Ratio Sustainability Index 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Nomenclature

a

Variable parameter (Table 5.1)

C

Financial support any currency

Dp

Depletion factor

Ex

Exergy (kJ)

f

Percent of green energy budget

ffc

Total fossil fuel consumption

pec

Total primary energy consumption

R

Ratio

SI

Sustainability index

Greek Letter

ψ

Exergy efficiency

Subscripts

D

Destroyed

ffu

Fossil fuel utilization

geb

Green energy financial budget

gei

Green energy impact

ges

Green energy–based sustainability

in

Input

p

Provided

pai

Practical implementation impact

si

Sectorial impact

ti

Technological impact

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Engineering & Applied ScienceUniversity of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT)OshawaCanada

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