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Industrial Ecology

  • İbrahim Dinçer
  • Calin Zamfirescu
Chapter

Abstract

Industrial ecology is an approach to sustainable development that combines the sciences of environment, ecology, and engineering technology. The word industrial indicates that the approach focuses on manufacturing processes of a complex of products, which eventually can be interrelated. The significance of the term ecology is twofold: first, that man-designed industrial systems can mimic natural ecosystems (bio-mimetics of natural cycles); second, that minimization of the environmental impact of the designed process is an important goal.

Keywords

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Methane Conversion Membrane Reactor Natural Cycle Exergy Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Nomenclature

Dp

Depletion factor

\( {{\dot{ E}x}} \)

Exergy rate, kW

\( {{\dot{ E}}}{{{x}}_{\rm{d}}} \)

Exergy destruction rate, kW

W

Work, kJ

\( \dot{W} \)

Work rate, kW

Greek Letter

ψ

Exergy efficiency

Subscripts

D

Destruction

in

Input

out

Output

SG

Syngas

Superscripts

(comb)

Combined

(sep)

Separated

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Engineering & Applied ScienceUniversity of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT)OshawaCanada

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