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Integrated Multigeneration Energy Systems

  • İbrahim Dinçer
  • Calin Zamfirescu
Chapter

Abstract

Multigeneration, also called polygeneration, refers to energy systems that produce several useful outputs from one single or several kinds of primary energy input (viz. fuel). The purpose of multigeneration is to enhance the utilization of primary resources (fuels) and reduce the wasted energy. This is a method of improving the efficiency of energy generation processes for better sustainability. Less fuel is required to produce a given amount of electrical and thermal energy in a single unit than is needed to generate the same quantities of both types of energy with separate, conventional technologies (e.g., turbine-generator sets and steam boilers). Apart from generating “energy products” through a multigeneration system, one can also fabricate by-products with added value, such as carbon fibers and various chemicals.

Keywords

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Heat Engine Exergy Efficiency Rankine Cycle Organic Rankine Cycle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Nomenclature

C

Specific cost, any currency

Ee

Economic effectiveness

ex

Specific exergy, kJ/kg

Ex

Exergy, kJ

G

Gibbs free energy, kJ/mol

GSEnF

Geothermal-solar energy fraction

h

Specific enthalpy, kJ/kg

HHV

Higher heating value, MJ/kg

H

Enthalpy, kJ

I

Solar irradiance, W

K

Equilibrium constant, Eq. (12.16)

LHV

Lower heating value, MJ/kg

m

Mass, kg

\( {\dot{m}} \)

Mass flow rate, kg/s

P

Pressure, bar

Q

Heat, kJ

R

Universal gas constant, J/kmol.K

RET

Thermal energy ratio

s

Specific entropy, kJ/kg K

S

Entropy, kJ/kgK

T

Temperature, K

V

Voltage, V

W

Work, kJ

Greek Letters

γ

Specific heat ratio

Δ

Difference

η

Utilization efficiency

ψ

Exergy efficiency

Subscripts

0

Reference state

abs

absorber

AC

Air conditioning

blow

Blower

C

Cooling or condenser

con

Condenser

d

destroyed

e

Electric

ev

Evaporator

FC

Fuel cell

gen

Generator

geo

Geothermal

H

Heating

hp

Heating process

HW

Hot water

i

index

inv

Inverter

j

Index

m

Material

mot

Motor

N

Nernst

o

Output

OP

Other product

PF

Primary fuel

pmp

Pump

S

Salt or stack

SF

Synthetic fuel

SH

Space heating

SS

Strong solution

T

Turbine

WF

Working fluid

WS

Weak solution

U

Uranium

Superscripts

ch

Chemical

P

Thermomechanical

(˙)

Rate (per unit of time)

()

Average value

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Engineering & Applied ScienceUniversity of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT)OshawaCanada

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