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Thermodynamic Fundamentals

  • İbrahim Dinçer
  • Calin Zamfirescu
Chapter

Abstract

Sustainable energy systems exhibit a diverse nature and cover a large number of processes such as energy conversion, heating, cooling, and chemical reactions. Sustainable energy engineering is a complex subject because many disciplines such as thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, electromagnetics, and chemical reaction engineering are encountered in its processes and applications.

Keywords

Heat Pump Entropy Generation Heat Engine Thermodynamic System Exergy Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Nomenclature

a

Acceleration, m/s2

A

Area, m2

c

Specific heat, J/kg K

COP

Coefficient of performance

d

Displacement, m

DOF

Degree of freedom

E

Energy, J

F

Force, N

g

Gravitational acceleration, m/s2

h

Specific enthalpy, J/kg

H

Enthalpy, J

kB

Boltzmann constant, J/K

K

Kinetic energy, J

KE

Kinetic energy, J

m

Mass, kg

M

Molecular mass, kg/kmol

n

Number of moles, mol or polytropic exponent

N

Number of molecules

NA

Number of Avogadro

p

Momentum, kg m/s

P

Pressure, Pa

PE

Potential energy, J

q

Mass specific heat, J/kg

Q

Heat, J

R

Universal gas constant, J/mol K

Rg

Real gas constant, J/kg K

s

Specific entropy, J/kg K

S

Entropy, J/K

T

Temperature, K

v

Velocity, m/s, or specific volume, m3/kg

V

Volume, m3

u

Specific internal energy, J/kg

U

Internal energy, J

W

Work, J

x

Vapor quality

Z

Elevation, m or compressibility factor

Greek Letters

α

Peng–Robinson parameter

γ

Adiabatic exponent

η

Energy efficiency

ψ

Exergy efficieny

ω

Accentric factor

Subscripts

gen

Generated

H

High

liq

Liquid

L

Low

n

Value corresponding to 1 mol

p

Constant pressure

r

Reduced value

rev

Reversible

t

Total

v

Constant volume

vap

Vapor

surr

Surroundings

sys

System

Superscripts

_

Average value

\( \bullet \)

Rate (per unit of time)

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Engineering & Applied ScienceUniversity of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT)OshawaCanada

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