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Overview of Intracellular Compartments and Trafficking Pathways

  • Andrei A. Tokarev
  • Aixa Alfonso
  • Nava Segev
Part of the Molecular Biology Intelligence Unit book series (MBIU)

Abstract

All eukaryotic cells contain membrane-bounded compartments that interact with the cell’s environment. Vesicles transport proteins and lipids between these compartments via two major pathways: the outwards, exocytic pathway, carries material synthesized in the cytoplasm to the cell milieu, and the inwards, endocytic pathway, internalizes material from the environment to the inside of the cell. This communication of the cell with its environment is crucial for all tissue and organ function. Here, we summarize progress made during the last two decades in our understanding of bi-directional transport pathways between intracellular compartments. The accumulated knowledge of intracellular compartments and pathways that connect them formed the basis for advancements made in our understanding of the molecular machinery components, mechanisms and regulation of intracellular trafficking. Whereas the major compartments and pathways are well defined, less is known about the dynamic nature and biogenesis of compartments.

Keywords

Golgi Apparatus Intracellular Trafficking Late Endosome Vesicular Transport Endocytic Pathway 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Landes Bioscience and Springer Science+Business Media 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of IllinoisChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Department of Biological SciencesUniversity of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA

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