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Duties and Rights of Biobank Participants: Principled Autonomy, Consent, Voluntariness and Privacy

  • Lars Øystein Ursin

Abstract

In this chapter the notion of principled autonomy is presented, and the perspective enabled by this notion is applied in the field of biobanking. Some consequences of the perspective of principled autonomy on aspects of biobank recruitment are discussed in relation to concepts of voluntariness, consent, and privacy. These discussions aim to focus on the fruitfulness of the notion of principled autonomy in bringing out the interconnectedness of the duties and rights of biobank participants – both in general, and in a context of taking part in a research-based universal health care system in particular.

Keywords

Moral Responsibility Acceptable Alternative Individual Autonomy Personal Autonomy Liberal Society 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lars Øystein Ursin
    • 1
  1. 1.Philosophy Department and Bioethics Research GroupNorwegian University of Technology and ScienceTrondheimNorway

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