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Cultural Challenges in Piloting Disability Surveys in Papua New Guinea

  • Patricia Thornton
Chapter

Abstract

While some of the difficulties discussed in this chapter may apply to social survey research in many developing countries, others are peculiar to the Papua New Guinea context and a brief description of that follows. The chapter focuses on selected issues faced in the research process: deciding on a definition of disability; limitations on involvement of disabled people in research production; and cultural influences on the process, with particular reference to expectations of benefit and consequent effects on the quality of data collected.

Keywords

Activity Limitation Community Leader Disable People Participation Restriction Pilot Survey 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Social Policy Research UnitUniversity of YorkHeslingtonUnited Kingdom

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