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The Global Burden of Infectious Diseases

  • Paulo Pinheiro
  • Colin D. Mathers
  • Alexander Krämer
Chapter
Part of the Statistics for Biology and Health book series (SBH)

Abstract

Over the last century, infectious diseases have lost a lot of their threat to individuals’ health as well as to the health of populations living in industrialized countries. The continuous reduction and effective control of both mortality and morbidity from infectious diseases marks an impressive story of success in the history of public health in the developed world and has been linked to a wide range of improvements that occurred alongside the socioeconomic modernization of these societies. Although many factors (e.g., improved sanitation, development of antibiotics and vaccines, improved living conditions and food quality/availability, and improved health care and surveillance systems) that contributed significantly to the success have been identified, there are, however, still uncertainties about the underlying mechanisms and interactions that led to the decline of infectious disease mortality

Keywords

Lower Respiratory Infection Global Burden Diarrheal Disease Disability Weight Respiratory Infectious Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paulo Pinheiro
    • 1
  • Colin D. Mathers
    • 2
  • Alexander Krämer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Public Health Medicine, School of Public HealthUniversity of BielefeldBielefeldGermany
  2. 2.Department of Measurement and Health Information SystemsWorld Health OrganizationGenevaSwitzerland

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