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The Advancement of World Digital Cities

  • Mika Yasuoka
  • Toru Ishida
  • Alessandro Aurigi

Abstract

Since the early 1990s, and particularly with the popularization of the Internet and the World Wide Web, a wave of experiments and initiatives has emerged, aiming at acilitating city functions such as community activities, local economies and municipal ervices. This chapter reviews advancements of worldwide activities focused on the creation of regional information spaces. In the US and Canada, a large number f community networks using the city metaphor appeared in the early 1990s. In Europe, more than one hundred similar initiatives have been tried out, often supported by large governmental project funds. Asian countries are rapidly adopting the latest information and communication technologies for actively interacting real-time city information and creating civic communication channels.

Keywords

Social Capital Virtual Community Information Space Digital City Virtual City 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.IT University of CopenhagenDenmark
  2. 2.Department of Social InformaticsKyoto University & Japan Science and Technology AgencyJapan
  3. 3.School of Architecture, Planning and LandscapeNewcastle UniversityNewcastleEngland

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