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Microstereolithography

  • Arnaud Bertsch
  • Philippe Renaud
Chapter

Abstract

Microstereolithography is a technology that is based on the same manufacturing principle as stereolithography. Three-dimensional (3D) objects are built by the superimposition of many layers, each being produced by a light-induced space-resolved photopolymerization of a liquid resin. As the resolution of microstereolithography is far better than other rapid prototyping techniques, this technique creates interest in both the rapid prototyping domain, where it can be used to produce high-resolution prototypes, but also in the microengineering field, as it is clearly the microfabrication process that can produce small objects with the most complicated shapes and intricate details.

Keywords

Light Beam Shape Memory Alloy Shape Memory Alloy Actuator Digital Micromirror Device Rapid Prototype Technique 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank all the research teams who have been involved in the microstereolithography field since this subject has started to be studied, in particular Prof. Koji Ikuta and Prof. Jean-Claude André who had a pioneer vision of this scientific domain.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de LausanneLausanneSwitzerland

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