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Solar Eclipses

  • J.M. Vaquero
Chapter
Part of the Astrophysics and Space Science Library book series (ASSL, volume 361)

A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon blocks the Sun from view. This is strictly correct, however other interesting conditions must be analysed for a better understanding of the phenomenon. The distances and diameters involved in the problem are listed in Table 4.1. Solar eclipses can only happen at a new moon phase when the Sun and the Moon are apparently very close in the sky observed from a place on the Earth’s surface. A typical popular graphical explanation of the solar eclipse phenomenon appears in Figure 4.1. However, eclipses do not occur every month (every new moon) because the lunar orbit is tilted. Thus, the apparent diameters of the Sun and the Moon and the position of the Moon in its orbit play fundamental roles in the production of solar eclipses.

Keywords

Sunspot Number Solar Corona Solar Eclipse Maunder Minimum Total Solar Eclipse 
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Authors and Affiliations

  • J.M. Vaquero
    • 1
  1. 1.Depto. FisicaUniversidad Extremadura Fac. CienciasSpain

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