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Scotland

Sustaining the Development of Health-Promoting Schools: The Experience of Scotland in the European Context
  • Ian Young
  • Anne Lee
Chapter

This case study reviews the development of health promotion in Scottish schools and examines the stages of development at the national level over a 20-year period, from the mid-1980s to 2006. The activities over this timeframe have led to the integration of health promotion as an integral and required part of the work of schools within a legislative framework. The case describes the process of change and how the changes initiated in the health sector have now become embedded within government policy and are beginning to be embedded in practice in the education sector.

Keywords

Health Promotion Education Sector Education Authority Scottish Executive School Ethos 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ian Young
    • 1
  • Anne Lee
    • 1
  1. 1.Health Promotion ConsultantEdinburghUnited Kingdom

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