Advertisement

A 58-year-old man was admitted because of the finding of a large left inguinal mass. The patient had night sweats for several weeks before he discovered the inguinal mass. There were no other superficial lymph nodes palpable. The CT scan showed no enlargement of hilar, mediastinal or axillary lymph node, but he had bulky retroperitoneal and pelvic adenopathy. The inguinal lymph node was biopsied (Fig. 48.1). A bone marrow biopsy was performed subsequently (Fig. 48.2).

Keywords

Bone Marrow Biopsy Inguinal Lymph Node Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Hematologic Neoplasm Germinal Center Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Stein H, Warnke RA, Chan WC, et al. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified. In Swerdlow SH, Campo E, Harris NL, et al. eds. WHO Classification of Tumours of Haematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues. 4th ed., Lyon, France, IARC Press, 2008, 233–237.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Pileri SA, Dirnhofer S, Went PH, et al. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: one or more entities? Present controversies and possible tools for its subclassification. Histopathology 2003;41:482–509.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Delsol G, Falini B, Müller-Hermelink HK, et al. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), ALK-positive. In Swerdlow SH, Campo E, Harris NL, et al. eds., WHO Classification of Tumours of Haematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues. 4th ed., Lyon, France, IARC Press, 2008, 312–316.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    de Leval L, Harris NL. Variability in immunophenotype in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and its clinical relevance. Histopathology 2003;43:509–528.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Personalised recommendations