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A 55-year-old man presented with worsening fatigue and easy bruisability for five weeks. Two weeks prior to admission, he complained of severe gingival pain, treated by a dentist for gingivitis with amoxicillin and clindamycin, but his symptoms did not resolve.

Keywords

Acute Myeloid Leukemia Lymphoid Leukemia Hematologic Neoplasm Acute Myeloid Leukemia Case Lysozyme Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

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