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Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Placement for Spinal Instrumentation

  • Hormoz Sheikh
  • Ramiro A. Perez de la Torre
  • Oksana Didyuk
  • Vickram Tejwani
  • Mick J. Perez-Cruet
Chapter

Spinal instrumentation has a long history, beginning with Hibbs [1] in 1911, who performed a posterior spine fusion for deformity. However, it wasn’t until 1962 [2], when Harrington began using distraction rods, that internal spinal instrumentation gained more widespread use. Luque further refined this technique by introducing segmental instrumentation in 1982. The modern era of lumbosacral spinal fixation was ushered in by the work of Roy-Camille et al. [3] with the use of universal instrumentation based on pedicle screw implants.

Keywords

Pedicle Screw Spinal Instrumentation Screw Head Pedicle Screw Placement Pedicle Screw Instrumentation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hormoz Sheikh
    • 1
  • Ramiro A. Perez de la Torre
    • 2
  • Oksana Didyuk
    • 1
  • Vickram Tejwani
    • 3
  • Mick J. Perez-Cruet
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryProvidence Medical Center, Michigan Head and Spine InstituteSouthfieldUSA
  2. 2.Spine Fellow, Department of NeurosurgeryProvidence HospitalSouthfieldUSA
  3. 3.China Medical UniversityShenyangChina
  4. 4.Director, Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery and Spine Program, Department of NeurosurgeryProvidence Medical CenterRochesterUSA
  5. 5.Adjunct Associate Professor, Oakland UniversityRochesterUSA

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