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Milton Keynes

  • John G. Kelcey
Chapter

Abstract

In terms of the age and scale of the urban developments described in the other chapters, Milton Keynes is new and small (occupying 9,000 ha with a target population of 250,000). It differs in its origin from most of those cities, which have grown (organically, as architects say) from a cluster of buildings on a trade route, being imposed on a predominantly rural area as the consequence of a Government decision. There was very little published botanical ­information available about the city before the start of development in 1971. Because 80% of the area was in intensive agricultural production the flora was “impoverished”, mainly comprising species of disturbed soil (arable land) and those that are ­characteristic of agriculturally improved grassland on damp, meso- to eutrophic soils. The areas of greatest botanical interest were at the extremes of the age range and separated by 1,000 years or so old woodland and young clay ­workings. Most of the habitats present have been created since 1971 and therefore comprise plant communities/associations that are unique and not found in the countryside or probably in any other urban area. They provide exciting opportunities for botanists to study the relationship between species that would not otherwise occur together and the dynamics of new plant communities.

Keywords

Plantago Lanceolata Corylus Avellana Lotus Corniculatus Road Verge Polygonum Aviculare 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Further Reading

  1. Bendixson T, Platt J (1992) Milton Keynes Image and Reality. Granta Editions, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  2. Cox J (1994) Woodland Islands – a Review of the Issues Arising from The Isolation of Ancient Semi-natural Woodlands within the Urban Matrix, with Special Reference to Milton Keynes. Hampshire and Isle of Wight Wildlife Trust, Curdridge, HampshireGoogle Scholar
  3. Croft RA Mynard DC (1993) The Changing Landscape of Milton Keynes. Buckinghamshire Archaeological Society, BuckinghamGoogle Scholar
  4. Maycock R, Woods A (2005) A Checklist of the Plants of Buckinhamshire (including Milton Keynes and Slough). Milton Keynes Natural History Society. Milton KeynesGoogle Scholar
  5. Milton Keynes Development Corporation (1970) The Plan for Milton Keynes. Milton Keynes Development Corporation, Milton KeynesGoogle Scholar
  6. Milton Keynes Development Corporation (1974 to 1990) Ecological Studies in Milton Keynes Volumes 1–120. Milton Keynes Development Corporation, Milton KeynesGoogle Scholar
  7. Milton Keynes Development Corporation (1992) The Milton Keynes Planning Manual. Milton Keynes Development Corporation, Milton KeynesGoogle Scholar
  8. Milton Keynes Natural History Society (2000) Milton Keynes More than Concrete Cows – Real Animals and Plants too. Milton Keynes Natural History Society, Milton KeynesGoogle Scholar
  9. Milton Keynes Natural History Society (1975–1977) Journals 1–4. Milton Keynes Natural History Society, Milton KeynesGoogle Scholar
  10. Milton Keynes Parks Trust (1993 to 2008) Ecological Studies in Milton Keynes Volumes 121 to 153. Milton Keynes Parks Trust, Milton KeynesGoogle Scholar
  11. Walker D (1981) The Archicture and Planning of Milton Keynes. Architectural Press, LondonGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Bor u TachovaCzech Republic

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