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Fuel in the Fire: How Anger Impacts Judgment and Decision-Making

  • Paul M. Litvak
  • Jennifer S. Lerner
  • Larissa Z. Tiedens
  • Katherine Shonk
Chapter

Abstract

In keeping with the handbook format, this chapter identifies four types of methods in the behavioral decision-making literature for detecting the influence of anger on judgments and choices. The types of methods include inferring the presence of anger from behavior, measuring naturally occurring anger or individual differences in anger, manipulating anger, and both measuring and manipulating anger. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each method and present evidence showing that the effects of anger often differ from those of other negative emotions. The chapter also introduces an overarching appraisal-tendency framework for predicting such effects and connects the framework to broader theories and associated mechanisms. Finally, we examine whether anger should be considered a positive emotion and propose that anger is experienced as pleasant when one is looking forward and unpleasant when one is reflecting back on the anger’s source.

Keywords

Negative Emotion Ultimatum Game Specific Emotion Trait Anger Heuristic Processing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgment

Grants from the National Institute of Mental Health (MH62376) and the National Science Foundation (PECASE SES0239637) supported this project. We thank the Center for Public Leadership at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government for administrative support. We also thank Max Bazerman for his countless acts of support.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul M. Litvak
    • 1
  • Jennifer S. Lerner
    • 2
  • Larissa Z. Tiedens
    • 3
  • Katherine Shonk
    • 2
  1. 1.Carnegie Mellon UniversityPorter HallUSA
  2. 2.Harvard UniversityCambridgeUSA
  3. 3.Stanford UniversityPalo AltoUSA

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