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Conceptual and Theoretical Framework

Part of the The Political Economy of the Asia Pacific book series (PEAP)

Abstract

Territorial disputes rarely break out in a political vacuum. They are often fought in an arena where international, regional, and domestic politics meet. For revisionist countries that challenge an existing territorial status quo, the most prominent way to achieve their goal is to acquire the territory in question. The process of acquisition itself can vary from peaceful (e.g., sale or concession of territory) to violent (e.g., military conquest). Most contemporary territorial disputes in East Asia fall between these two extremes: they persist, while neither reaching peaceful resolutions nor escalating into full-scale militarized conflicts.

Keywords

East Asian Country Territorial Dispute Economic Interdependence Initial Impetus ASEAN Regional Forum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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