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Through a Kaleidoscope: Gendered Lives in Deerfield, MA

  • Deborah Rotman
Chapter
Part of the Contributions To Global Historical Archaeology book series (CGHA)

Abstract

The metaphor of a kaleidoscope characterizes the complex and ever-changing meaning and practice of gendered social relations. Gender interacts with a myriad of other social prisms – including, but not limited to, competing gender ideologies, socioeconomic class, political agendas, and developmental cycle of individuals and families – to create complex patterns of identities and relationships.

In Deerfield, village residents were aware of republican motherhood, cult of domesticity, equal rights feminism, and domestic reform, among many other ideologies. Women and men, however, created and codified gender roles and relations in ways that were appropriate to their respective needs, desires, and abilities. Although gender ideologies existed in idealized forms, they were rarely adopted in totality; rather, they were interpreted and/or combined according to their unique labor requirements, financial constraints or abundance, economic and social position, and the like.

Keywords

Gender Role Color Code Gender Relation Gender Ideology Ball Family 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Deborah Rotman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of Notre DameNotre DameUSA

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